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Revised title: Pouring dye into ballot boxes, laying flowers at the Kremlin, staging noon against Putin: How Russians are protesting the electio

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Revised title: Pouring dye into ballot boxes, laying flowers at the Kremlin, staging noon against Putin: How Russians are protesting the electio

In a flurry of chaotic protests during the Russian presidential election, citizens resorted to extreme tactics in an attempt to disrupt the voting process. Reports emerged of individuals pouring dye into ballot boxes, setting off explosives, and even attempting arson in sporadic acts of defiance.

Despite these incidents occurring on the first day of the three-day voting period, officials were quick to reassure the public that they would not impact the election outcome. With President Vladimir Putin widely expected to secure his fifth term in office, the focus has shifted to the voter turnout and the number of legitimate ballots cast. A high turnout is seen as crucial to the Kremlin to lend a sense of legitimacy to the election results.

Two women were arrested for pouring green dye into ballot boxes on the outskirts of Moscow, an act punishable by up to five years in prison. Meanwhile, Yulia Navalnaya, wife of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, has called on supporters to protest at polling stations in a bid to challenge the election process.

Tensions around the election have been further exacerbated following Navalny’s death last month, with accusations against Putin for his alleged involvement leading to widespread protests. The Kremlin is keenly watching voter turnout as a barometer for public opinion on the ongoing war in Ukraine, hoping to surpass the 67% turnout seen in the 2018 election.

Reports from parts of occupied Ukraine have also highlighted allegations of Russian military members forcing Ukrainian citizens to vote at gunpoint. Against this backdrop, Vladislav Davankov stands as the sole candidate running against Putin, supporting peace negotiations with Ukraine on Russia’s terms.

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With over 114 million Russians eligible to vote in the election, all eyes are on the results expected to deliver a landslide victory for Putin. As the country awaits the final outcome, the protests and disruptions during the voting process serve as a stark reminder of the deep divisions and challenges facing Russian society.

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